Consider a Giving Tuesday 2022 Donation on November 29

On Giving Tuesday 2022 (November 29) the Institute invites you to join millions of people around the world in supporting your favorite charitable organizations with a tax-deductible contribution. We rely on your support to continue offering all of our public school jazz education and mentorship programs 100% free of charge to participating students, teachers, schools, families and communities.

The Institute is making a real difference every day in the lives of students across the country. 100% of high school seniors who participate in our education programs graduate from high school. More than 95% continue on to college, and many receive significant college scholarships thanks in part to the Institute’s professional mentorship and advocacy. We are keenly focused on equity, with the majority of students participating in Jazz in the Classroom and our National Performing Arts High Schools Program identifying as people of color.

Your Giving Tuesday 2022 donation–at any level–can help us empower the next Herbie Hancock to make seismic contributions to the music, build new audiences for jazz and its positive message, and inspire students to stay in school. Here are just a few examples of how your contribution makes a difference:

  • Supports music instruction, instrument training, master classes, lessons on jazz and music history and other programming for thousands of public school students in communities in Baltimore, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, Newark, San Francisco, Washington, D.C., the Mississippi Delta and beyond.
  • Enables a select group of the world’s most gifted young musicians to study tuition-free with legendary jazz musicians and educators at the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz Performance at UCLA, preparing them to become the next generation of jazz masters.
  • Brings renowned jazz musicians and educators into 12 public performing arts high schools across the United States to provide intensive jazz training throughout the school year.
  • Helps us reach people in all 50 states and more than 190 countries through International Jazz Day outreach, educational initiatives and performances, as well as educational and cultural diplomacy tours in conjunction with the U.S. State Department.

Want to learn more about these and other Institute initiatives that are uniting, edifying and inspiring people of all ages, backgrounds and nationalities? Have a look at our education programs, or send us an email—we’d be glad to answer your questions!

We can’t wait for you to join us on Giving Tuesday 2022 on November 29. If you’d like to make a tax-deductible contribution now, please use our secure online donation form, or check out the many other ways to give.

The application for the College Program class entering fall 2023 is now available

The application for the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz Performance at The UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music class entering in fall of 2023 is now available. Click here to download the application, including instructions and performance requirements. Applications may be submitted online via Acceptd or by email to Institute West Coast Director Daniel Seeff, and must be received no later than December 1, 2022.

Click here to learn more about the Institute’s two-year college program, and please feel free to email us with any questions.

Institute/LAUSD All-City band wows attendees at Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival

Students in the Institute’s Los Angeles-based Jazz in the Classroom program showcased their skills at this weekend’s Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival, one of the premier live jazz events on the West Coast. A joint project with the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) Beyond the Bell Branch, the Herbie Hancock Institute/LAUSD All-City Jazz Band drew plaudits not only from the assembled audience, but also Festival staff and high-profile participants. Festival Host and jazz aficionado Arsenio Hall said he “could not believe it was a high school band. They were on fire!”

The Herbie Hancock Institute/LAUSD Beyond the Bell All-City Jazz Band performs at the 2022 Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival. (Photo by Greg Grudt/Mathew Imaging)

Reflecting its credentials as a collection of the city’s most talented young jazz musicians, the All-City group shared billing with an array of eminent musicians. The 2022 Festival, which was presented from June 25-26, featured such jazz luminaries as Veronica Swift, Gerald Clayton, Gregory Porter, Terri Lyne Carrington and Carmen Lundy. Also appearing were venerable crossover acts including The Roots, Tower of Power, and Femi Kuti & The Positive Force. The All-City Jazz Band’s set featured exciting big band arrangements of Perdido (Duke Ellington/Juan Tizol), Cantaloupe Island (Herbie Hancock), Now’s the Time (Charlie Parker) and Blue Bossa (Kenny Dorham), giving the audience a taste of multiple eras and flavors of jazz.

The Institute has been a consistent presence in Los Angeles public schools for more than 25 years, and the All-City Jazz Band is a mainstay of its educational and mentorship efforts. Each year, the Institute selects approximately 20 exceptionally talented young musicians to participate in this full big band. Students rehearse and study with Institute teaching staff and perform for the Los Angeles community at leading venues and events. In addition to more than a decade of appearances at the Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival, the All-City Jazz Band has also performed at LA’s storied Central Avenue Jazz Festival, the historic Roxy Theatre and the Catalina Jazz Club, among other venues.

“Could not believe it was a high school band. They were on fire!”

Arsenio hall, 2022 hollywood bowl jazz festival host
The Herbie Hancock Institute/LAUSD Beyond the Bell All-City Jazz Band performs at the 2022 Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival. (Photo by Greg Grudt/Mathew Imaging)

A Unique Learning Opportunity

All-City Jazz Band participants receive intensive instruction and coaching from Institute Vice President of Education and Curriculum Development Dr. JB Dyas, as well as guest instructors. Dyas co-directs the band with LAUSD Beyond the Bell Branch Visual & Performing Arts Coordinator Anthony White. The musicians study advanced performance techniques associated with performing professional-level big band repertoire, drill down into harmony and improvisation, and learn about each chart’s history and place in the jazz tradition. As an integral part of the Institute’s approach to the All-City Jazz Band, every student in the group is required to memorize the melody and chord changes for each tune, as well as develop competency with soloing.

The Herbie Hancock Institute/LAUSD Beyond the Bell All-City Jazz Band at the 2022 Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival. (Photo by Greg Grudt/Mathew Imaging)

At the conclusion of every school year, the All-City Jazz Band delivers a featured performance as part of the culminating spring concert for the Jazz in the Classroom program, alongside a renowned guest artist. Recent guest artists have included pianist Kris Bowers; drummer Peter Erskine; guitarist Kevin Eubanks; saxophonists James Carter and Joshua Redman; and vocalists Patti Austin, Tierney Sutton, Lalah Hathaway, Jane Monheit and Michael Mayo.

The Institute thanks the Hollywood Bowl Jazz Festival for its kind invitation for the All-City Jazz Band to perform this year–and looks forward to our next appearance.

All-Star Student Ensembles Lead Public School Peer-to-Peer Tours Alongside Bobby Watson, Lisa Henry, Sean Jones

From May 9-22, the Institute resumed its in-person Peer-to-Peer jazz education tours after two years of virtual programming due to the COVID-19 pandemic. With support from the National Endowment for the Arts and United Airlines, exceptionally talented student musicians from the Institute’s high school programs visited public middle and high schools in Delaware and Wisconsin for intensive performances, rehearsals and master classes–continuing the jazz tradition of intergenerational mentorship.

The Peer-to-Peer program brings some of the nation’s most talented student jazz musicians into under-resourced public schools across America. The student mentors lead live performances and demonstrations of key jazz concepts, discussions on the history and cultural significance of jazz, and inspiring rehearsals and workshops with the host schools’ jazz bands and choral groups. The Institute conceived this initiative around the simple but powerful concept that students are often more receptive and learn more effectively when their “teachers” are young people their own age. Since launching in 2006, Institute Peer-to-Peer tours have directly impacted more than 250,000 students. With the recent addition of Delaware and Wisconsin, the program has visited schools in 42 U.S. states.

Renowned trumpeter Sean Jones (left) performs with pianist Nathan Tatsuta for students at Reagan High School in Milwaukee as part of the Wisconsin Peer-to-Peer Tour. (Photo by Bart Marantz / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz)

Students from Coast-to-Coast

Over the course of the two weeklong tours, students selected from the Institute’s National Performing Arts High Schools programs in Baltimore, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Houston, Los Angeles, New Orleans and Washington, D.C. performed and taught alongside renowned trumpeter and Peabody Institute professor Sean Jones, acclaimed Kansas City vocalist Lisa Henry and GRAMMY Award-winning saxophonist Bobby Watson at schools in Dover and Wilmington, DE and Milwaukee, WI. The members of the Institute’s National Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet for the Delaware tour included trumpeter Loren Littlejohn (18) from Dallas; tenor saxophonist Leo Milano (17) from Chicago; pianist José André Montaño (16) from Washington, DC; bassist Camara Dupree (16) from New Orleans; and drummer Matthew Fu (18) from Houston. For the Wisconsin tour, the Quintet consisted of Ebban Dorsey (17) from Baltimore; trombonist Melvin Nimtz (18) from New Orleans; pianist Nathan Tatsuta (15) from Santa Ana, CA; bassist Jack Rota (18) from Dallas; and drummer JJ Mazza (17) from Denver.

Each school visit included an assembly program for the entire student body, followed by in-depth peer-to-peer instruction with students in the school’s music program. The interactive presentations included opportunities for student musicians from each host school to showcase their skills alongside the Institute band.

A student at the Milwaukee School of the Arts performs with vocalist Lisa Henry and the Institute’s National Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet during a stop on the Wisconsin tour. (Photo by Bart Marantz / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz)

Building Bridges, Through Music

After an unprecedented two years of life spent adapting to the pandemic, the in-person tours brought a sorely needed human connection back to the target schools. Wrote one school district official, the Institute’s visits “have fundamentally helped all of us remember the value of being together, the importance of community, and the magic of music.”

Another district superintendent commented, “Our students, staff and community walked away with a deeper understanding of how jazz has contributed to our history in the United States. The performance created a catalyst that built bridges across generations, race, gender orientation and religion…this experience has expanded our students’ interest in jazz as a genre.”

“The informances and workshops have fundamentally helped all of us remember the value of being together, the importance of community, and the magic of music.”

– Dover, Delaware School District Official

A Taste of Things to Come

At the end of each exhilarating week spent sharing their love of jazz with children their own age, the Institute students were eager to carry on with another hallowed tradition of the Peer-to-Peer program–the gig. Both tours concluded with evening performances by the Institute’s National Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet at top jazz clubs. In Milwaukee, the Peer-to-Peer Quintet impressed local audiences with two performances at the city’s newest live jazz venue, Bar Centro. The Delaware group capped off its week with a pair of sets at iconic Baltimore jazz club Keystone Korner, which has hosted jazz legends like Ron Carter, Joey DeFrancesco, Kenny Garrett and Dee Dee Bridgewater. The Institute players got an authentic taste of the demands of working as professional musicians as they performed challenging arrangements of jazz standards, original works by the accompanying jazz masters, and their own compositions.

Legendary alto saxophonist Bobby Watson performs with the National Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet (from left, José André Montaño, Loren Littlejohn, Camara Dupree, Leo Milano and Matthew Fu) at Keystone Korner in Baltimore on May 22, capping the Delaware Peer-to-Peer tour. (Photo by Bart Marantz / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz)

Lisa Henry, who has participated in Institute Peer-to-Peer tours since their inception, captured the formative nature of the touring experience as she counted off the students’ set at Keystone Korner. “It never ceases to amaze me,” she remarked, “how special it is to watch young musicians–young artists–at the very beginning of their take-off. What you’re witnessing here is something very special.”

Institute Concludes Educational & Cultural Tour of Jordan

The Institute completed its first international tour since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, with jazz legend and Institute Chairman Herbie Hancock joining acclaimed saxophonist Don Braden and the eight students of the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz Performance at UCLA for a week of teaching, learning and cultural exchange in the Kingdom of Jordan. Sponsored by the U.S. State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the May program continued the Institute’s commitment to using jazz to advance diplomacy, dialogue between cultures and mutual understanding.

Over the course of five days, the Institute delegation visited prominent educational, performing arts and community service organizations in and around the Jordanian capital, Amman, offering free concerts and master classes for local students and jazz lovers. Complementing the extensive outreach programs were visits to the vaunted 5th-century BC city of Petra, as well as outdoor concerts at the ancient ruins of Gadara in Umm Qais and the Odeon, a Roman amphitheater situated in the heart of downtown Amman.

A Focus on Education

As part of the tour’s educational offerings, young Jordanians aspiring to careers in music gathered at the King Hussein Foundation’s National Centre for Culture and Arts (NCCA) for an informance, concert and jam session with the Institute band. Led by Braden, the Institute of Jazz Performance students gave musical demonstrations of every major stylistic touchpoint in jazz, from ragtime to present day. To represent the fusion era, the group invited Hancock up for a performance of his landmark composition “Actual Proof.” Later, Institute of Jazz Performance clarinetist Matthew Stubbs led a demonstration of the connections between Western classical music and jazz.

Class of 2023 vocalist Darynn Dean performs alongside teaching artist Don Braden during the Institute’s master class at Jordan’s National Centre for Culture and Arts. (Photo by Steve Mundinger / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz)

The intensive session gave the assembled Jordanian musicians an invaluable opportunity to listen to and learn from world-class jazz artists in an intimate setting, and to share their own talents and musical perspectives. To close the educational program, more than a dozen music students and faculty from the NCCA and Jordan’s National Music Conservatory gave a special performance fusing traditional Jordanian music with contemporary improvisational forms. The entire group then convened for a spirited jam session, demonstrating that when it comes to jazz music, no translation is required.

Musical Relief

Perhaps the most moving moment of the trip came in the northern city of Jerash, where the Institute delegation gathered to perform for a group of Syrian refugee students at the Princess Taghrid Institute for Development and Training. Established by Jordan’s King Abdullah and led by Princess Taghrid Mohammad, the Princess Taghrid Institute provides lodging, education and psychological support to orphaned and abandoned youth, including those displaced by the ongoing war in Syria, which has led to an influx of more than 1 million refugees over the border into Jordan. The musicians’ interactive presentation included the performance of jazz standards and original compositions, a basic introduction to the history and significance of jazz music, and an instrument “petting zoo” for the youngsters, many of whom had never had opportunities to hold musical instruments in their hands.

The Institute of Jazz Performance students lead a musical presentation for Syrian refugees at the Princess Taghrid Institute for Development and Training in Jerash. (Photo by Steve Mundinger / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz)
A young student at the Princess Taghrid Institute for Development and Training tries her hand at the drums as part of the Institute delegation’s visit. (Photo by Steve Mundinger / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz)

Memorable Performances

With the blessing of Jordan’s Department of Antiquities, Hancock, Braden and the Institute students also brought the contemporary sounds of jazz into some of the Kingdom’s storied archaeological sites. At Umm Qais, against the iconic backdrop of the Sea of Galilee and the Golan Heights, the group gave an hourlong concert for Jordanian officials and guests, showcasing a range of original compositions and inventive takes on some of Hancock’s classic tunes. At the final concert at the Odeon, the multigenerational band illuminated the millennia-old amphitheater with songs blurring the lines between jazz, blues and local traditional music, including an Arabic maqam-inflected performance of “Autumn Leaves” featuring renowned Jordanian vocalist Macadi Nahhas.

The Jordan tour proved an apt addition to the long tradition of U.S. State Department-led cultural diplomacy abroad, following in the footsteps of the famed Jazz Ambassadors program from the 1950s. As one American diplomat remarked of the Institute’s visit, “It’s remarkable and wonderful that here we are, almost 70 years after [the Jazz Ambassadors] program began, still connecting with each other through the beauty and inclusiveness of jazz music. That is the power of this art form.”

Special thanks to the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and the U.S. Embassy in Jordan for sponsoring this program.

Air transportation for the May 2022 Jordan tour was provided by United Airlines, the official airline of the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz.

Institute Presents Educational Jazz Informance at U.S. Department of Education, Hosted by Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona

The Institute’s recent jazz informance at the U.S. Department of Education displayed all the hallmarks that have made the annual event a favorite for Department colleagues and DC and Baltimore public school students and teachers alike. These included a superb high school student group–the Institute’s Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet, a renowned guest artist–internationally acclaimed trumpeter Sean Jones­–and the pedagogical prowess of jazz educator and Institute Vice President of Education and Curriculum Development Dr. JB Dyas. This year, the presentation featured one other notable element: the participation of U.S. Secretary of Education Dr. Miguel Cardona, who traded his customary speaker’s podium for a pair of bongos and joined in on lively renditions of Herbie Hancock’s compositions “Chameleon” and “Watermelon Man.”

Back in the Groove

The April 19 jazz informance brought audiences back into the Department of Education building after two years of virtual presentations due to the pandemic. The excitement in the auditorium was palpable as dozens of Department of Education officials, students and educators–including 2021 National Teacher of the Year Juliana Urtubey–took their seats. In parallel, students in hundreds of school districts across the United States and music lovers around the world had the opportunity to watch the afternoon program via livestream on the Department of Education’s YouTube, Facebook and Twitter accounts.

Secretary of Education Dr. Miguel Cardona (far left) performs alongside the Institute’s Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet at the U.S. Department of Education, April 19, 2022. (Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Education)

“Jazz is the Great Equalizer”

In just over 90 minutes, students from the Institute’s Jazz in the Classroom programs in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., led by Dr. JB Dyas, demonstrated the roots and rhythms of jazz through a dynamic series of performances and presentations. The session included explanations of jazz history, performance practices, and the music’s role in promoting equality and mutual understanding among people with vastly different backgrounds. “Jazz is the great equalizer,” Dr. Dyas noted to resounding applause, because in a jazz group, factors like ethnicity, religion and gender all become secondary to “what you have inside.”

Institute Vice President of Education and Curriculum Development Dr. JB Dyas (left) leads the April 19 jazz informance alongside Sean Jones (fourth from right) and the Institute’s Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet. (Photo courtesy U.S. Department of Education)

The student Quintet, made up of pupils from the Institute’s Jazz in the Classroom and National Performing Arts High Schools jazz programs, included alto saxophonists Ebban Dorsey and Quinn Rehkemper from the Baltimore School for the Arts; tenor saxophonist Elijah Woodward and pianist José André Montaño from the Duke Ellington School of the Arts; and drummer Jillian Upshaw from Jackson Reed High School. Leading the performances was renowned jazz trumpeter and Peabody Institute professor Sean Jones.

“Jazz can teach us about ourselves…it’s nothing short of enlightening.”

– Miguel Cardona, U.S. Secretary of Education

In his remarks before taking to the bandstand with the Institute group, Secretary Cardona emphasized the centrality of students in the Department of Education’s activities. “You give us purpose,” he declared to the assembled young musicians. “We can’t thank you enough for brightening our lives with your talent–each of you is an inspiration.” The Secretary also touched on the valuable practical lessons jazz offers, noting that “jazz can teach us about ourselves, and how to overcome adversity. Watching a live jazz performance is a lesson in leadership–listening and collaborating, improvising and improving, recognizing and reimagining…it’s nothing short of enlightening.”

Watch the complete jazz informance below, including Secretary Cardona’s performance:

Institute Announces Delaware Peer-to-Peer Jazz Education Tour, May 16-22

Weeklong series of events includes two performances open to the public at Keystone Korner in Baltimore on May 22

Washington, DC – With lead funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and United Airlines, the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz will bring its Peer-to-Peer jazz education program to Delaware public schools May 16-20, 2022. Combining performance with educational information, these “informances” will be presented by the National Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet, comprising five of the country’s most gifted high school music students. They will be featured alongside internationally acclaimed saxophone recording artist Bobby Watson, Kansas City jazz and blues vocalist and a former winner of the Institute’s International Jazz Vocals Competition Lisa Henry, and renowned jazz educator Dr. JB Dyas. Each school visit will include an assembly program featuring a musical performance for all students, followed by workshops for each school’s jazz band and choir with the visiting student performers playing alongside and sharing ideas with their Delaware counterparts.

“We’ve found that sometimes young people can learn about certain things better from kids their same age, and one of them is jazz,” said jazz great Herbie Hancock, Institute Chairman, NEA Jazz Master, and Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). “And when you hear how accomplished these musicians are at such a young age, you know their peers are going to listen.”

Besides playing jazz at a level that belies their years, the students will talk with their Delaware peers about what jazz is, why it’s important to America, and how a jazz ensemble represents a perfect democracy. They also will discuss the important American values that jazz represents: teamwork, freedom with responsibility, unity with ethnic diversity, the correlation of hard work and goal accomplishment, and the importance of finding a passion early in life, being persistent, and believing in yourself. When young people hear this important message from kids their same age, they are often more likely to listen.

The members of the all-star quintet selected nationwide to participate in the Delaware tour include trumpeter Loren Littlejohn (18) from Dallas; tenor saxophonist Leo Milano (17) from Chicago; pianist José André Montaño (16) from Washington, DC; bassist Camara Dupree (16) from New Orleans; and drummer Matthew Fu (18) from Houston. “I had the opportunity to sit in with Mr. Watson the last time he performed at the Jazz Showcase in Chicago” said Milano, who is one of the best tenor saxophonists for his age in the country. “I’ve been a big fan of his for a long time, and now having the opportunity to tour with and learn from him is really incredible!”

Immediately following the informances, Watson, Henry, and Dyas will conduct jazz workshops for each host school’s jazz band and choir. The visiting students will play side-by-side with their Delaware counterparts, providing tutelage peer to peer. In so doing, they will teach and learn from one another not unlike what Herbie Hancock did with Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, and so many other eminent band mates over the past half century. They’ll also learn about each other’s cities and cultures.

“We’re really looking forward to traveling to this historic part of the country,” added Fu, who was recently selected to this year’s edition of the Carnegie Hall National Youth Jazz Orchestra. “We’re even planning a day trip to Philadelphia to see the Liberty Bell and other U.S. historical landmarks.”

The weeklong tour will conclude with two performances open to the public on May 22 at Baltimore’s iconic jazz club, Keystone Korner (1350 Lancaster St.), where Baltimore residents and visitors are invited to enjoy an evening of music with Watson and Henry alongside jazz’s future “young lions.” The septet will perform standards, jazz classics, and contemporary jazz, including compositions from Watson’s and Henry’s latest recordings. The shows begin at 5:00 pm and 7:30 pm. For further information call 410-946-6726 or visit www.keystonekornerbaltimore.com.

Learn more about the Peer-to-Peer jazz education program

Download the full press release

International Jazz Day 2022 Concludes with Spectacular All-Star Global Concert from the United Nations

Concert Calls for Peace and Solidarity Worldwide, Capping Daylong Celebrations in More than 180 Countries

New York – With more than 180 countries participating, the International Jazz Day 2022 celebration concluded with a moving All-Star Global Concert reaching millions around the world. Hosted by UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Herbie Hancock, the concert featured artists from all corners of the globe joining together to affirm the unifying power of jazz and issue a heartfelt call for peace and solidarity to the world.

(From left) Herbie Hancock, Ravi Coltrane, James Genus, Randy Brecker, Brian Blade and Zakir Hussain perform at the International Jazz Day 2022 All-Star Global Concert at the United Nations. Photo by Steve Mundinger / Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz

Presented from the very center of international diplomacy – the United Nations – the 2022 Global Concert showcased jazz’s unparalleled ability to build bridges and forge consensus through dialogue. The opening performance set the pace, with blues vocal phenom Shemekia Copeland performing her social justice tribute “Walk Until I Ride” alongside Marcus Miller, Brian Blade, John Beasley (Musical Director) and Mark Whitfield. Other highlights included GRAMMY Award-winning vocalist Gregory Porter joining musicians from Australia, Brazil, Japan and the United States for a soulful rendition of his acclaimed original “No Love Dying;” jazz legend David Sanborn performing “Georgia On My Mind” with a band including Linda May Han Oh and Terri Lyne Carrington; and an extraordinary interpretation of Herbie Hancock’s “Maiden Voyage,” led by Hancock himself, with Ravi Coltrane, James Genus, Zakir Hussain, Brian Blade and Randy Brecker.

Addressing a host of global crises, including the conflicts in Ukraine and other locations throughout the world, as well as the ongoing impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, the 2022 Global Concert recognized music as a powerful tool for healing and positive change. “The music shows up when we need it most,” host Herbie Hancock noted, “to ease our burdens and boost our spirits.”

The 2022 Global Concert crowned a day of worldwide International Jazz Day celebrations, including performances, education programs and community outreach activities organized by UNESCO, the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz and thousands of partners across the globe.

Major support for International Jazz Day is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Air transportation and additional support for artists and educators is provided by United Airlines, the airline partner of International Jazz Day.

Each year on April 30, International Jazz Day brings together countries and communities on all continents to honor the international art form of jazz, highlighting its important role in encouraging dialogue, combating discrimination and promoting human dignity.

Learn more about International Jazz Day

Institute Set to Bring All-Star HS Jazz Quintet to Milwaukee Public Schools for Peer-to-Peer Tour, May 9-13

Featuring internationally renowned recording artists Sean Jones and Lisa Henry

Washington, DC – With lead funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and United Airlines, the Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz will bring its Peer-to-Peer jazz education program to Milwaukee public schools May 9-13, 2022. Combining performance with educational information, these “informances” will be presented by the National Peer-to-Peer Jazz Quintet, comprising five of the country’s most gifted high school music students. They will be featured alongside internationally acclaimed trumpet recording artist Sean Jones, Kansas City jazz and blues vocalist and a former winner of the Institute’s International Jazz Vocals Competition Lisa Henry, and renowned jazz educator Dr. JB Dyas. Each school visit will include an assembly program featuring a musical performance for all students, followed by workshops for each school’s jazz band and choir with the visiting student performers playing alongside and sharing ideas with their Milwaukee counterparts.

“We’ve found that sometimes young people can learn about certain things better from kids their same age, and one of them is jazz,” said jazz great Herbie Hancock, Institute Chairman, NEA Jazz Master, and Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). “And when you hear how accomplished these musicians are at such a young age, you know their peers are going to listen.”

Besides playing jazz at a level that belies their years, the students will talk with their Wisconsin peers about what jazz is, why it’s important to America, and how a jazz ensemble represents a perfect democracy. They also will discuss the important American values that jazz represents: teamwork, freedom with responsibility, unity with ethnic diversity, the correlation of hard work and goal accomplishment, and the importance of finding a passion early in life, being persistent, and believing in yourself. When young people hear this important message from kids their same age, they are often more likely to listen.

The members of the all-star quintet selected nationwide to participate in the Wisconsin tour include alto saxophonist Ebban Dorsey (17) from Baltimore; trombonist Melvin Nimtz (18) from New Orleans; pianist Nathan Tatsuta (15) from Santa Ana, CA; bassist Kenny Haddox (17) from Dallas; and drummer JJ Mazza (17) from Denver. “We’ve really grown a lot by exploring Sean Jones’ music in preparation for the tour,” said Dorsey, who was featured in last year’s peer-to-peer jazz group which presented a jazz informance webinar for the US Department of Education (and has now had over a half million views on YouTube). “His compositions are both a challenge and a joy to play and listen to.”

Immediately following the informances, Jones, Henry, and Dyas will conduct jazz workshops for each host school’s jazz band and choir. The visiting students will play side-by-side with their Wisconsin counterparts, providing tutelage peer to peer. In so doing, they will teach and learn from one another not unlike what Herbie Hancock did with Miles Davis, Wayne Shorter, and so many other eminent band mates over the past half century. They’ll also learn about each other’s cities and cultures.

“We’re really looking forward to hanging out and playing jazz with the students in a completely different part of the country,” added Nimtz, who was recently selected to this year’s edition of the Carnegie Hall National Youth Jazz Orchestra. “I’ve heard that not unlike my hometown of New Orleans, Milwaukee takes its jazz seriously.” Indeed, the city has produced such distinguished artists as Lynne Arriale, Bunky Green, Woody Herman, Al Jarreau, Brian Lynch, Willie Pickens, and others of that stature.

The weeklong tour will conclude with two performances open to the public on May 13 at Milwaukee’s newest jazz club, Bar Centro (804 E Center St.), where Milwaukee residents and visitors are invited to enjoy an evening of music with Jones and Henry alongside jazz’s future “young lions.” The septet will perform standards, jazz classics, and contemporary jazz, including compositions from Jones’ and Henry’s latest recordings. The shows begin at 7:00 pm and 9:00 pm. For further information call 414-455-3751 or visit https://barcentro.com.

Download the complete press release

Learn more about the Peer-to-Peer program

International Jazz Day 2022, April 30th, a Call for Global Peace and Unity

Global Concert from United Nations Headquarters in New York to be hosted by Herbie Hancock, feature Marcus Miller, Gregory Porter, David Sanborn, Hiromi, Pedrito Martínez, Ravi Coltrane, José James, Terri Lyne Carrington, Linda Oh, Shemekia Copeland, Lizz Wright and others

Paris and New York––UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay and UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Herbie Hancock today announced the program for the 2022 celebration of International Jazz Day, with events taking place in more than 180 countries.

The flagship Jazz Day event, a spectacular All-Star Global Concert, will be staged in the UN General Assembly Hall, in New York, emphasizing the importance of jazz as a means of achieving unity and peace through dialogue and diplomacy. With Herbie Hancock serving as Host and Artistic Director and John Beasley as Musical Director, the program is set to feature performances by some of the world’s most accomplished jazz artists, including vocalists Shemekia Copeland, José James, Youn Sun Nah (Republic of Korea), Gregory Porter, Alune Wade (Senegal) and Lizz Wright; pianists Joey Alexander (Indonesia), Helio Alves (Brazil), Laurent de Wilde (France), Hiromi (Japan), Ray Lema (Democratic Republic of Congo), and Tarek Yamani (Lebanon); drummers Terri Lyne Carrington and Brian Blade; bassists James Genus, Marcus Miller and Linda Oh (Australia); saxophonists Ravi Coltrane, David Sanborn and Erena Terakubo (Japan); guitarist Mark Whitfield and trumpeters Randy Brecker and Jeremy Pelt, among others.

Also joining the global ensemble will be harmonicist Grégoire Maret (Switzerland), harpist Edmar Castañeda (Colombia), percussionist Pedrito Martínez (Cuba) and clarinetist Kinan Azmeh (Syria). Further information on the 2022 cast is available on jazzday.com.

This concert will be webcast worldwide on April 30th at 5 pm EDT/2 pm PDT/11 pm CET on jazzday.com, unesco.org, hancockinstitute.org, the International Jazz Day YouTube and Facebook channels, UN Web TV and US State Department outlets.

“Jazz carries a universal message with the power to strengthen dialogue, our understanding of each other, and our mutual respect. As the world is affected by multiple crises and conflicts, this international day highlights how much music and culture can contribute to peace,” said Audrey Azoulay, Director-General of UNESCO.

“With conflict and division in many parts of the world, it is my hope that, through the universal language of jazz, our celebration this year can inspire people of all nations to heal, to hope and to work together to foster peace,” said Institute Chairman Herbie Hancock, who co-chairs International Jazz Day with the Director-General of UNESCO.

Master classes, concerts, educational and other programs worldwide

In the lead-up to the 2022 All-Star Global Concert, a series of free, online education programs will be presented via In the lead-up to the 2022 All-Star Global Concert, a series of free, online education programs will be presented via jazzday.com, unesco.org, and the official International Jazz Day YouTube and Facebook pages. World-renowned jazz artists including multiple Grammy Award winners Arturo O’Farrill and Terri Lyne Carrington, Oran Etkin, Danny Grissett, Dan Tepfer and others will lead master classes and presentations. A complete listing and schedule of education programs will be available at jazzday.com/education. The 2022 education programs are presented in collaboration with the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice, the JAM Music Lab University (Vienna) and the UCLA Herb Alpert School of Music, among other organizations.

Shortly before the Global Concert, at 3 pm EDT, UNESCO will celebrate the musical talent of women from across Africa with a second edition of its JazzWomenAfrica concert series. Organized in collaboration with the cultural agency ANYA Music (Morocco), JazzWomenAfrica helps counter the under-representation and insufficient recognition of women in the music industry. A discussion with women artists and music producers on this theme will take place on April 29th at 11 am EDT.

The worldwide program for International Jazz Day 2022 also includes an extraordinary array of programming in more than 180 countries, with concerts and performance-based initiatives complemented by diverse social outreach and educational activities. In Central Africa, the organizers and partners behind the Biennale of Luanda/Pan-African Forum for the Culture of Peace will present an extensive series of virtual roundtables, concerts, exhibits and other events highlighting the contribution of jazz in promoting peace, uniting people and fostering cooperation around the world. In the Republic of Korea, the Korean Jazz Association and other partners are planning six days of concerts themed around freedom. A “National Jazz Week,” culminating on International Jazz Day, will begin on April 21 across Chile, with participation from UNESCO Artist for Peace Danilo Pérez. Meanwhile on April 29th in the United States, Newark, New Jersey public radio station WGBO will celebrate the renaming of the street on which it resides in honor of legendary jazz musician, composer and Newark native Wayne Shorter.

To learn about the thousands of other events planned in all 50 U.S. states and countries across the world, visit jazzday.com/events.

Major support for International Jazz Day is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Air transportation and additional support for artists and educators is provided by United Airlines, the airline partner of International Jazz Day.

Established by UNESCO in 2011 at the initiative of UNESCO Goodwill Ambassador Herbie Hancock, and recognized by the United Nations General Assembly, International Jazz Day brings together countries and communities worldwide every 30 April. The Herbie Hancock Institute of Jazz is UNESCO’s partner in the organization and promotion of International Jazz Day.

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Media: contact Alisse Kingsley